The previous owner of a farm in Grand Rapids, Michigan, had witnessed the meteorite as it crashed into the Earth sometime in the 1930s, and dug it out of a newly formed crater when it was still warm, following a big boom.

When he sold the Edmore property to David Mazurek in 1988, Mazurek inherited the hefty hunk of iron and nickel, which had been doubling as a doorstep for several decades.

“I asked him what it was and he said, ‘A meteorite.’ I’m going, ‘Get out of here!’” Mazurek recalls, reports WFLA. “So he told me the whole story about how it came down back in the early ’30s.

“He says, ‘This is yours. It goes with the farm.’ I had it for 31 years.”

Whether or not the previous owner had any idea of the rare space rock’s worth, Mazurek took it to Dr. Monaliza Sirbescu of the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences for identification purposes.

“Within seconds, I knew that this was a real one,” says Sirbescu in a video uploaded by the Central Michigan University. “It’s 88.5 percent iron, and 11.5 percent nickel.”

It was determined that this 22.5-pound (approx. 10.2-kilogram) meteorite is the sixth largest to be found in Michigan state.

Moreover, after it was examined by the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C., the unconventional doorstop was evaluated at $100,000—now that’s one valuable doorstop.

If a space rock flew into your backyard one day, what would you do? Would you fancy the idea of a jutted-edged doorstop from out of space too?

Source:theepochtimes